Category Archives: Speaking

DGC Roundtable: Advertising Week Learnings

The weekly DGC Roundtable is monitored by our current intern, Jamie Kurke.

This week was a hectic one. Everyone was shuffling in and out of the office to attend Advertising Week events for our clients– or just for fun! With that in mind, this week’s question was:

What was the best session/ learning/ quote you heard from Advertising Week?

Patrick Wentling, Account Executive:

There was a lot said this week, but my favorite quote actually came from Michael Strahan during his conversation with Facebook’s Carolyn Everson, where he spoke on how his dad said “not if, when.” It was an inspirational story considering how great his career – before and after football – came to be. Although I spent my youth booing him, I now have a new found respect for him.

Megan Sweat, Account Executive:

“Consumers are living in a state of ‘present shock.’ They are living in a world where everything happens now, and they are in a constant state of emergency interruption. There’s no time for advertising and being interrupted. Don’t interrupt me in the flow, provide me with the thing I need when I need it and not a second after.” – Douglas Rushkoff, media theorist and author

Jackie Berte, Account Executive:

Quote of the week:  “You’ll regret it if you don’t take a picture with the Aflac Duck” – at the Advertising Week Icon and Slogan Hall of Fame

Chrissy Perez-O’Rourke, Account Director:

When brands are looking to operate at the “speed of culture” they should be asking themselves three things:

  • What makes sense for their brand?
  • Which aspects of real-time trends and culture are a fit with the brand’s core messaging and essence?
  • Does the brand want to enter an existing conversation or create a new one?

To read more about the panel Chrissy attended, check out her latest Hit Board post!

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Best Practices for Operating at the “Speed of Culture” – sparks&honey and Reebok Break it Down

As a part of Advertising Week 2014, the 4A’s hosted its Competitive Edge series on Sept. 29, bringing together top agency and brand executives to debate the value of operating at the intersection of cultural intelligence and business innovation.

The session kicked off with a video clip from the new HBO show, “Last Week Tonight,” in which anchorman John Oliver explored recent examples of brands’ Twitter #fails. From the DiGiorno mixup with the trending #WhyIStayed hashtag to various brands tweeting misguided 9/11 content, the clip raised some very interesting points about when it is the right time for a brand to engage in real-time social practices.

Terry Young, CEO/Founder of ad newsroom sparks&honey, and his colleague Imari Oliver, VP, Director of Creative Strategy, and good friend, David Oksman, U.S. Marketing Director at Reebok, spoke about best practices for brands that want to operate at the “speed of culture” in a session entitled, Leading Culture and Collaboration.

Why do so many brands struggle with creating authentic social conversations? According to Young, brands need to identify places, trends, dialogue and topics that they want to be attached to as a first step. When thinking about everything that is happening in social – it can seem overwhelming and random, so brands need to sort through everything and zero in on the select areas of opportunities, he said. Moving at the “speed of culture” isn’t an easy feat but it’s essential for brands that want to be successful in today’s world.

Oksman’s advice: Brands need to be strategic rather than opportunistic.  Just like an athlete, brands can develop muscle memory when it comes to identifying trends/cultural elements to attach to  – that is what drives nimbleness, Oksman said.

Culture is the pulse of the social world and there are two types – “slow culture” and  “fast culture,” according to Young. 3D printing, autonomous cars, and the sharing economy are examples of “slow culture” – these affect companies and brands over a long term. Memes and viral videos though are examples of “fast culture” that impacts culture and consumers in the short term.

The panelists concluded that when brands are looking to operate at the “speed of culture” they should be asking themselves three things:

  • What makes sense for their brand?
  • Which aspects of real-time trends and culture are a fit with the brand’s core messaging and essence?
  • Does the brand want to enter an existing conversation or create a new one?

Because isn’t creating conversations what it’s all about?

(INSERT PICTURE FROM PANEL)  From left to right: Terry Young (CEO/Founder of sparks&honey), David Oksman (U.S. Marketing Director at Reebok) and Imari Oliver (VP, Director of Creative Strategy at sparks&honey) with panel moderator, Advertising Age reporter, Malika Toure

From left to right: Terry Young (CEO/Founder of sparks&honey), David Oksman (U.S. Marketing Director at Reebok) and Imari Oliver (VP, Director of Creative Strategy at sparks&honey) with panel moderator, Advertising Age reporter, Malika Toure

Financial Times Future of Marketing – Millennials, Music, and Data

Russell Wallach, President of Media and Sponsorship at Live Nation, spoke on how the world’s largest live-entertainment company uses data to reach consumers at the second annual Financial Times Future of Marketing Conference on Sept. 17, which brought together executives across a variety of industries.

“The journey of the fan experience, from ticket purchase to the end of the show months later, can be improved by data, and fans welcome anything they can to enhance those moments,” said Wallach.

And what is the future of marketing? The answer is Millennials, known as the most “social” generation ever because of their global, digital connectedness. Many agreed that music is at the intersection of marketing to this group.

“We have first party data from our over 200million-plus user database,” said Wallach. “So that presents a great opportunity for our brand and agency partners to develop unique properties.”

Wallach listed examples that included a recent investment in electronic dance music (EDM) by 7Up to target millennials and Hispanics and working with Kellogg’s to create a summer concert series targeted towards tweens.

To close out the day, Bruce Flohr, co-founder of GreenLight Media & Marketing, sat down with Marc Roberge, lead singer of O.A.R. to talk about how they market themselves to brands. “Music is worthless, yet everyone loves music,” said Flohr. “Everyone walks around with earbuds on, you can’t escape it, but the music has no tangible value.”

“The U2 deal with Apple really put the nail in the coffin for selling albums and completely devalues music,” said Roberge. “We now look for brands who want to partner with us. We want to understand why a brand chose us, and make sure it fits for everyone involved.”

Everyone agreed that the future for marketing is bright but cluttered as brands try to navigate every channel to reach their audience.

Audience Measurement 2014: The Leadership Mandate

This year’s the Advertising Research Foundation’s Audience Measurement (AM) 2014 focused on the Measurement Mandate and an immediate call-to-action for analysts to embrace the future of programmatic buying and cross platform measurement and lead their respective organizations through the considerable changes brought by today’s complex media environment.

Gayle Fuguitt, President and CEO of The ARF’s opening address set the tone for the event. In it, she explained there is a code red problem facing the industry. For example, the ARF’s research found that less than 10 percent of marketers say that mix models help them understand cross-platform advertising. Fuguitt emphasized that analysts must recognize this to be a transformative moment.

“This is not a measurement mandate, but rather a leadership mandate,” said Fuguitt. “We need to collaborate within our organizations, across organizations and across the world and we need to listen to each other and converge.”

Gayle Fuguitt

In his address Bob Lord, Global CEO of AOL Platforms, delved into the power of convergence and how it can transform industries at the intersection of business and technology.  Lord believes that measurement is key to truly understanding consumers and creating a brand strategy that meets consumers’ needs.

“Convergence of technology, media and creativity allows us to imagine and enable customer experiences like never before,” said Lord.  “Technology, media, and creativity operating within the context of business strategy can transform a marketing problem.”

Bob Lord

Lord also discussed his five principles when using data to better the consumer experience. He explained that brands need to put the consumer at the center and understand what motivates them and their journey to trying or using a product. Marketers must start thinking of their brand as a service and be aware of the fact that they are in the business of fulfilling consumer needs. It is also crucial to reject silos; consumers don’t care about inter-department issues and neither should businesses. Brands also need to act like a startup and employ agile methodology and prototyping. Finally, brands must embrace diversity in order to raise ROI’s on company performance.

AM 2014 wasn’t only a discussion of big data and ways to improve audience measurement across platforms. It was also a look at those who are solving measurement challenges and generating significant business results. In that spirit, the first annual Erwin Ephron Demystification Award was announced at the conference, an award that honors the legacy of media leader, Erwin Ephron.

Bill Harvey, Co-Founder and Strategic Advisor of TiVo Research and Analytics, was the first winner of this prestigious award. He has spent over 35 years in the media research industry and has pioneered thinking in New Media, industry data, and audience measurement standards.

“Bill challenges conventional thinking, and has a rare ability to translate ideas into action,” said Fuguitt. “The Erwin Ephron Demystification Award was part of the greater goal of AM 2014 to support, inspire, and promote the analytical minds that will lead organizations through this period of dynamic change.”

Bill Harvey & Gayle Fuguitt

The overarching message of AM 2014 was the need for analysts to embrace new ways of thinking in order to keep their seat as the C-suite’s most trusted advisor, a mission that the ARF will continue in future events and research.

 

 

Closing Remarks from Re:Think 2014

Following an exciting few days at the New York Marriott Marquis, the Advertising Research Foundation’s Re:Think 2014 conference has come to a close, after more than 168 paper submissions were presented from the top companies in business. With key insights from industry luminaries like Keith Reinhard, Carolyn Everson and Lee Garfinkel, the days were jam-packed with valuable insights and takeaways for attendees to take back to their desks and influence their work.

We caught up with Gayle Fuguitt, CEO and President of the ARF, for her biggest takeaway from the conference and how Re:Think 2014 ushered in a new era for the ARF.

For more Re:Think 2014 highlights, see below for a small sampling of the great coverage that ran this week:

Advertising Age: How Big Data Shapes AT&T’s Advertising Creative

Direct Marketing News: Video: Three Questions with the ARF’s Gayle Fuguitt

The Makegood: Why the Best Advertising is Formed When Art Meets Science

Re:Think 2014: Great Insights, Great Innovation, Great Results

Day Two at the Advertising Research Foundation’s Re:Think 2014 conference was about rethinking ideas to derive better insights, and ultimately better creative executions and results.

Lee Garfinkel, CEO of FCB Garfinkel, gave the first keynote of the day said the industry needs more clarity and simplicity in using smart research to inform smart advertising. Rather than wasting time thinking outside of the box, he encourages people to think about how to get out of the corner. “Science won’t get you great ideas alone. You need the gut instinct of great thinkers.”

Garfinkel’s other call to action was to come up with the great idea that will change the mind of the consumer. Demonstrated by his own iconic Diet Coke example from 1994,  he explained how the soft drink faced several challenges — from being too generic to being seen as for “women on a diet.” Garfinkel realized they couldn’t fix all of Diet Coke’s needs at once. “We asked the right question to get the right answer. The question was ‘which one of these should we address first?” Diet Coke’s response? “Make us relevant again.’”

Garfinkel and his team did just that, creating a spot that alleviated many of these issues and helped Diet Coke re-gain market share. The spot speaks for itself:

The second session keynote of the day was a fireside chat between Kim Brink, VP Marketing at NASCAR, and 4A’s EVP Michael Donahue, titled “Branding 180% Turnaround.” One of NASCAR’s marketing challenges is that people perceive it as a sport only popular in the South, without a huge reach. Conversely, the race car brand is second to the NFL in terms of recognition and hosts as many as 70 million fans at their events every year.

NASCAR’s goal was to have consumers rethink the brand. By tapping into insights around what its most rabid fans love about the sport, NASCAR was able to exact that passion and leverage it for new fans. The exercise allowed NASCAR to find its brand voice, which Brink acknowledged they didn’t previously have. NASCAR then signed their first ad agency, Ogilvy + Mather, and leveraged the insights about what rabid and casual fans love most, to create a dynamic spot that went on to be listed as the “Best Sports Commercial of the Year” in 2013.

The overarching message today was that marketers need to challenge their creative thinking by starting the process with smart research and clear insights.

 

Insights from Day One at ARF Re:Think 2014

The DGC team has been live from Advertising Research Foundation (ARF)  Re:Think conference in New York City this week, soaking up all of the intelligent conversations and insights being shared around analytics and insights.

Day One focused explicitly on consumer engagement and how to make better decisions across platforms. Here are some of our key learnings from the first day:

Carolyn Everson, VP of Marketing Solutions, Facebook (Photo Credit: Doug Goodman)

Mobile is now. Carolyn Everson, VP of Global Marketing Solutions at Facebook, admitted that even the largest social network in the world was caught off guard by the rise of mobile. But the reality is, that with over five billion phones currently in use, consumers are constantly on the go – and usually active on more than one device. More than one-third of those five billion people are using at least three or more devices in a given day, and 60 percent of consumers start a task on one device and end on another. So what’s the next step in mobile’s evolution? Personalization.

 

Peter Espersen, Head of Co-Creation, Content, and Campaigns, The LEGO Group (photo credit: Doug Goodman)

Peter Espersen, Head of Co-Creation, Content, and Campaigns, The LEGO Group (photo credit: Doug Goodman)

Understand your fans. Peter Espersen, head of co-creation at LEGO, shared how the brand sought to understand the fans, tap into their passion for LEGOs, and then in fact produce what the fans want. After several petitions, LEGO created several limited edition series, including the infamous DeLorean Time Machine from Back to the Future, a Minecraft series, and the very first fan-petitioned LEGO, the Shinkai 6500, a Japanese submarine. Espersen explained that no one would have seen the fan demand for Shinkai or Minecraft but, given that LEGO allowed its fans’ voices to be heard, it created what was wanted.

 

 

Keith Reinhard, DDB Worldwide (Photo Credit: Doug Goodman)

Keith Reinhard, Chairman Emeritus, DDB Worldwide (Photo Credit: Doug Goodman)

Insights can help create the story. When you leverage insights in the right way, you can tell the story the consumer actually wants to hear. That was the takeaway from ad legend Keith Reinhard, Chairman Emeritus of DDB Worldwide. Reinhard showed a famous State Farm ad from the 1960s, featuring the still-iconic “Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there” jingle, and a real State Farm insurance agent based in Hawaii. “The insight was that the hometown neighbor is always there, which led to the “Like a Good Neighbor,’” said Reinhard, “Consumers could get their own personal neighborhood State Farm agent.” The tagline is still used today.

 

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The conversation was positive and encouraged the audience to question how brands are engaging with consumers. Even if you’re doing something right, you can always look at new data or find another angle that resonates in a new way, generating more insightful campaigns and buzz.

DGC Live from Cannes: Execs Weigh in on State of the Industry

The 2013 Cannes Lions Festival has officially come and gone but the thoughts and musings have returned stateside, leaving us inspired and energized.

We asked some of the industry’s top execs their thoughts about this year’s Cannes; what they learned, where they think the industry is headed, and how to make it even better.

Ignacio Oreamuno, Executive Director of the Art Directors’ Club, on what he’s seeing that’s new and different from other Cannes Festivals.

Katie Kempner, Executive Director, Global Communications, at CP+B, talks about gender equality within the advertising industry.

Chuck Porter, Chairman of CP+B, announces his “plans” for “Cannes 2,” a less crowded version of Cannes, taking place at his house in Boulder, starting in 2014.

Sam DiGennaro, CEO and founder of DiGennaro Communications, discusses how agencies, companies, and Cannes can improve the presentation, publicity and packaging of seminars next year by using hashtags, video, and more.

Gareth Kay, Chief Strategy Officer at Goodby Silverstein & Partners, talks about new ways to think about advertising and how to improve next year’s festival.

Charles Courtier, Global CEO of MEC, champions MEC’s Momentum study and why it’s an imperative tool for brand-marketing strategies.

Marla Kaplowitz, CEO of MEC North America, shares details of Momentum, a proprietary MEC study to help marketers get more efficient and targeted with their media plans.

Amanda Morgan McAllister, Director of Microsoft Advertising, thinks Cannes is back with a vengeance thanks to start ups and established companies pushing beyond traditional boundaries.

Matt Britton, CRO of MRY, on why Cannes is so special for the industry, particularly within the digital and social community.

Matt Rednor, Chief Innovation Officer at MRY, talks about what he’s looking forward to at his first Cannes Festival of Creativity.

Shane Ginsberg, SVP of Corporate Development at Organic, highlights what is new and different this year at Cannes.

Matt Batten, Chief Creative Officer of Wunderman Group UK, live from Wunderman’s “3rd Space,” on the vision that shaped it and how it came together.

Beyond the Panel: How to Leverage SXSW Speaking Opps for Maximum PR

Conference and festival season is well and truly upon us. Two marquee industry events, the SXSW and the 4As Transformation conference, kick-off this weekend and many of us are busy preparing for events, panels and presentations. Standing out amongst a sea of stimulating content isn’t easy but there are people who nail it time and time again. So what makes a winning formula?

Ad exec Cindy Gallop – whom you may recall from her brilliant Ted Talk “Make Love Not Porn,” — is a prime example of a savvy speaker who leverages her appearances for maximum PR value. Gallop has built a strong social network of followers who amplify the effort she puts into every speaking opportunity, ensuring her content reaches a much larger audience than the one sitting directly in front of her. She’s also very smart about her content; it’s provocative, unique and she delivers it in emotive, shareable quips that people can’t help but tweet — and in many cases, this social buzz begets editorial coverage.

If you have a speaking slot at SXSW (or anywhere else for that matter), you’ve got a fantastic opportunity to spread your message to attendees, as well as all your other stakeholders around the country.  Here are some tips to make the most of the opportunity:

  1. Reporters make great presentation guests, so invite them! A media blast alerting relevant reporters to your presentation is essential. Keep it short and sweet – these guys get inundated during SXSW, but even if they can’t make it to your presentation you’ve opened the dialogue for follow-up pitching and deeper dives into the topic.
  2. What’s the bigger picture? Ensure the content of your panel ladders up to a bigger picture PR strategy. You can publish POVs before and after your panel to start and maintain dialogue around your topic, through bylines placed in relevant media outlets or even on your own corporate blog.
  3. Invite everyone you meet. Much of the value of SXSW comes in the interactions with people on the fly – at parties, workshops or standing in line. Carrying something to give to the people you meet telling them about your presentation/panel works a treat, so consider securing some business cards that you can hand out in the days leading up to your session. A piece of card handed from human to human is still effective, even in this digital world.
  4. Slide branding 101. Each of your slides should have the event’s Twitter hashtag, Twitter handles of all presenters/panelists, and your company name/logo + handle. People will forget them if they’re only shown at the start – make it easy for them to promote you. Include a link to your presentation on the last slide.
  5. Social is your friend. Enlist some social support people (in the audience or even remotely) to live tweet and make your content shine throughout the presentation – both from their own handles or your corporate one. If you’re on a panel, remember that you’re competing for share of tweets so ensure your social support team is smart about what they tweet to get those valuable retweets. Visuals make great social content and keep your sound bites to just that, bites – snackable content is highly tweet-able.
  6. Keep your content snack-able. Whether you’re presenting or are part of a panel, think about little tweet-able bites, quotes and statistics you can share. If you’re in control of the slide content, include visuals that are clear and easy to understand, without the commentary. Many people take pictures of interesting slides (again, brand your slides clearly!) and tweet, Facebook or blog them so make sure yours stand out and are attributable to you.
  7. Get more mileage out of your panel through guest columns and blogs. Repurpose your content through POVs in media outlets or even your own corporate blog.  
  8. Use your slides as a marketing tool. Each of your slides should have the event’s Twitter hashtag, Twitter handles of all presenters/panelists, and your company name/logo + handle. Make your slides easily accessible (on SlideShare or a similar site) for maximum sharing. Have your social media person tweet the link to the presentation a couple of times – with the event hashtag – from your corporate handle during the presentation so your audience knows where to access it (you should see a bunch of retweets of the presentation too – good for attracting more followers to your handle and getting your content out there).
  9. Video the presentation. Find a friend with a flipcam and give them a front row seat. The end result might not be slick, but it can be chopped up and used for blog posts post-presentation. Your team can even create a series of quick-fire video captures of audience members before and after to see what they thought.
  10. Take pictures. Whether you post them on Instagram, Flickr, your blog, Pinterest or Facebook, pictures of you on stage will help give that personal behind-the-scenes feel to your post-presentation social content. Take a before picture with your co-presenter or fellow panelists (it’s likely you’ll be surrounded by people post-panel).

The Onion’s Baratunde Thurston, a rising star on the speaking circuit, is another executive to follow to inspire your PR strategy. He lays out a strong thought leadership foundation of relevant topics leading up to his presentations and  leverages social channels (both his and the event’s) to continue the dialogue afterwards. His keynote at last year’s SXSW, “How to Read the World,” captured a great deal of earned column space.

Whether you’re keynoting a conference or hosting a more intimate session, you can spread your message even further with the right strategy in place. Break a leg!

4A’s IAM Students Place 3rd in Advertising Futures Competition

Posted by Melissa Ann Im

Top advertising agencies and high schools teamed up to present their creative campaigns for the 9thAnnual Advertising Futures Competition on October 3, 2012 at the office of JWT in New York City. The competition took place as part of Advertising Week, bringing together the Ad Council, agencies and students. Excitement mounted due to the possible reward – the winning team’s ad will be featured in

IAM Places 3rd at Competition

The New York Times and posted on a billboard on 42nd Street.

This year’s assignment: Design an ad campaign to build awareness and encourage employers to hire U.S. veterans. Students were asked to develop a campaign to convince American citizens that war veterans should not only be viable candidates for blue/white collar jobs, but should be highly sought after for having received training that only the military can provide.

The client was the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA).

The students and their partner agencies including JWT, DDB, McCann and others had three weeks to prepare a campaign. After only three briefing meetings, the students had to conduct research, strategize and flesh out a full campaign to achieve the marketing objective.

The presentations were impressive, and a group of top industry panelists, including IAVA Chairman and former CEO of Y&R, Ed Vick, carefully examined each campaign. At the end of the presentations the judges deliberated, and before announcing the winners went through each campaign providing feedback and compliments on the students’ work and creativity.

Ron Berger, an active supporter of the competition and one of the founders of the High School for Innovation in Advertising and Media (IAM) in Brooklyn, spoke to encourage and commend the students for what they were doing for the future of the industry.  He even mentioned that the competition was his favorite part of Advertising Week.

IAM’s Ad Campaign

IAM presented a clean and unique campaign in the form of a resume with all of the traits and qualifications of America’s war veterans. IAM placed 3rd out of more than 10 schools which is a huge accomplishment for the students considering this is the first year they have placed. IAM students
have participated in the competition.

A big congratulations to all of the schools and a special congratulations to the 4A’s IAMHigh School participants.

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