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Burger Battle: What’s the Best Local Burger Joint?

At DGC our passion for PR might be overshadowed by our passion for food..  This week we decided to pit local burger spots against each other and see which location came out on top.

Turns out, it wasn’t that close of a competition…Madison Square Park’s Shake Shack took home gold without breaking a sweat.

While there can only be one winner, burgers are burgers, so no one is truly a loser.  Below hear from a few of our biggest burger fans on their favorite burger and, more importantly, why.

shakeshack

SHAKE SHACK

My favorite local burger spot is Shake Shack because I am a big fan of their buns. – Maria Swift, Account Coordinator

It’s got to be Shake Shack – they don’t know how to disappoint.  (QP w/ C is obviously a close second though) – Jackie Berte, Senior Account Executive

Shake Shack.  Two words: shack sauce. It’s what dreams are made of. ­– Ali Colangelo, Account Director

I love Shake Shack. My guilty pleasure is a burger and a shake and having it outdoors in the park, makes it all that much sweeter. ­– Maryliz Ghanem, Vice President

Shake Shack. GET IN MY BELLY. – Gab Berman, Senior Account Executive

Shake Shack– this was a tough one because I am a burger a week kind of gal and these all have a special place in my heart, but Shake Shack just has it all (despite the very long lines). You cannot beat their burgers or amazing cheese fries or the overall aura of being in the park on a nice day. – Peyton McCarthy, Account Executive

Shake Shack ‘shroom burger in the park wins for me. The line is long, but always worth the wait.  – Lexi Hewitt, Account Coordinator

Shake Shack is the best burger in the neighborhood. The line is long but it’s definitely worth it for their perfect, juicy burgers, crinkle fries and the beautiful setting of Madison Square Park.  – Mari Santana, Vice President

SchnippersLogo

SCHNIPPERS

Schnipper’s, hands down. They have the best milkshakes, which always go well with burgers. The day Soraya and I ordered lunch and they gave us double meals was heaven. – Sara Ajemian, Senior Account Director

All three are solid winners in my book, but what separates Schnipper’s is the cheese fries and special Schnipper’s sauce, along with ample seating and welcoming environment in any weather — can’t eat Shake Shack in the winter! — Pat Wentling, Senior Account Executive

ny burger

NEW YORK BURGER & CO

While a classic Quarter Pounder with Cheese is always hard for me to pass up at McDonald’s, my pick has to go to NY Burger & Co, but really only by default – It’s definitely a great burger and I do like the array of dipping sauce options, but I haven’t had a chance to check out Shake Shack or Shnippers yet. – Claire Higgins, Account Executive

I like NY Burger Co. because the food is delicious, the service prompt and polite, and it’s very close to our office. Second place is Schnipper’s, which also has great food and service and more ample seating but it’s several blocks away. ­– Kathy Sampey, Vice President

Hmm I’ve never had a burger at Shake Shack or Schnippers so my vote for our area would be New York Burger & Co. – Yana Berliner, Office Administrator

DGC Takes on the Streets of Flatiron for Its Third Annual Scavenger Hunt

Take a picture with Batman and Superman. Practice spinning on a set of Citi Bikes. Get a mini-makeover from Sephora. Order a “secret” menu item at Chipotle Mexican Grill.

For the third year in a row, DGC set aside an afternoon for a team-building scavenger hunt that brought out the kid—and the must-win competitive streak—in all of us here at DGC.

DGC President Howard “Howie” Schacter ruled as the impartial judge for this year’s hunt, which took place in New York’s Flatiron District. And in addition to ruling on the viability of tasks completed by teams to win a pizza party, he was also the sole judge of the coveted prize of the afternoon for Best Team Spirit.

Evident by our Call Me Maybe rendition, DGC-ers aren’t shy about “getting into character.” So with Halloween on the horizon, each of the five teams came up with a team theme and costumes to bring it to life. We were “The Tacky Tourists,” “The Texas Tailgaters,” “The Blackouts,” “The Zoo-perstars,” and Team Spirit winner “The Spice Girls.” And let me say, the outfit choices did not disappoint. Click here for pics of each team.

So with the big costume reveals done, the actual scavenger hunt kicked off. Lists were distributed and the teams took to the streets – completing as many items as possible in an hour and a half. Pretty remarkably, all of the team returned back to the office on time and with all but one or two clues completed. It looked as though it was going to be a close call for the top spot.

Tallying the points revealed that The Texas Tailgaters won, by two points, with each of the other teams coming in only a point or two behind that. We were all “winners” in the end – at least that’s what we told ourselves at the bar later that night!

Hats off to another exciting Scavenger Hunt – until next year!

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Talking the Talk: How to Speak PR in the UK

ImageEver chased a journalist? How many sell ins have you done this week? Chances are, the answers are yes and many, but that’s not how you would say it. A “sell in” is a pitch, and to “chase” means to follow up. While the general approaches and goals of PR are the same on both sides of the pond, the terminology is quite different. When scheduling a “sit down” (meeting) with someone, be sure to check your “diary” (calendar) first. What we call “hits” or “clips” are the more formal “pieces of coverage” in the Queen’s English, and a byline is known as a “comment piece.” A company’s revenue is referred to as “turnover” and where we’d call financials simply “numbers,” here they are “figures.” Though these phrases aren’t what I’m used to hearing, they’re all pretty logical terms (unlike when I learned that a “plaster” is actually a Band-Aid…) and it’s helpful to be able to talk to the talk across various countries—even other English speaking ones!

Beyond the vocab, there are a few other differences when it comes to PR and media relations in the UK and the US. England has a large variety of national papers (approximately 13) where the US of A has mainly regional papers, with a few national exceptions that are particularly competitive. It’s more of result of geography than anything else: compared to the UK, the United States is absolutely massive and there aren’t many national outlets, but there are loads of regional ones. To put it in perspective, the entire UK (including all of Great Britain and Northern Ireland) is roughly the size of the state of Oregon. The number of outlets aside, there is also some variation in what the media is interested in. There aren’t as many talk shows in Britain as there are in the US, and they are less likely to cover something purely consumer-facing with no strong news angle. While a hard news hook helps with securing coverage no matter where you are, it’s even more important to get in with the UK media. For this reason, surveys and research are used regularly—with some clients as often as 2 or 3 times a week.

Of course, everyone at Eulogy! has been very helpful in explaining all this to me and has been kind enough to not laugh directly at me when I ask what a particular word means. For the record, “jelly” refers to jell-o, a “biscuit” is actually a cookie, “chips” in the UK are French fries, and I still can’t figure out why Band-Aids are “plasters.”

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