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Monday Morning Mad Men: Welcome back!

It’s been a long 17 months since we’ve seen our friends at Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce. We’re back in 1966 and SCDP is still trying to nail new business they desperately need. As we found out at the end of season four, Don has convinced Heinz to give them small piece of their business – the beans division – with the hopes of bringing attention to this often overlooked sub-brand (behind Ketchup). Thus, we find Peggy in the pitch room trying to sell in their first campaign idea to the client.

In the creative presentation, Peggy presents the team’s best campaign idea for the beans – a Bean Ballet. The client is not immediately thrilled (as Peggy expected), instead asking for something more conservative. Don joins the room and Peggy expects him to come to her rescue as her so often does when clients aren’t buying more provocative ideas. Surprisingly, Don simply agrees to come back to the client with something different and more in line with his desires. Peggy leaves feeling deflated from rejection, but that’s because she wasn’t working with the client’s vision.

If we were SCDP’s counsel on pitching new business, we would have made four recommendations to Peggy:

  1. Get the brief right. Briefs are critical to success. They allow clients to share their desires and visions from the outset, while helping to set expectations. When written properly, they are an important tool for both teams to stay on the same page and avoid disconnects along the way.
  2. Understand the way your client thinks, and tailor your pitch accordingly. If you know you have a conservative client that won’t be open to pushing the envelope, present your more conservative ideas first. Over time you can earn your client’s trust for more boundary-pushing ideas. If you can anticipate your client’s reaction, you will have a leg up for how to present your ideas, and how to work with them over time to take more risks.
  3. Communicate with your client. If there is a disconnect between the client and the agency, the work will suffer. Consequently, the relationship will suffer too. Make sure there is an open dialogue between you and your client…not just with your day-to-day client, but with the key decision makers. This will get you one step closer to success.
  4. Learn when to hold ‘em, learn when to fold ‘em. Sometimes (most of the time), a client wants what a client wants. Understanding when it’s appropriate to push for your own ideas, and when it’s appropriate to back down, is an art form, not something that’s learned from one meeting. Sometimes conceding your own ideas in the interim will allow your client to trust you later on.

We’re sure Peggy and the creative team will come back with a winning idea next week. Stay tuned!

I Hope You Have The Timeline Of Your Life

Wednesday was another big day for Facebook. In addition to hosting its first ever Marketing Conference, which viewers could watch via live stream on the Facebook site, Facebook also launched its Timeline pages for brands. New features include an updated layout with a cover photo, the ability to edit content without having to open separate pages, and opportunities to add content that spans the course of the brand’s lifetime to date.

But how will consumers respond to this new brand page format?

Before Facebook launched brand Timeline pages, it launched personal Timeline profiles. Similar to the brand Timeline pages, users can upload cover photos, edit content in one place and add information to past years to create a more robust illustration of the entirety of their lives to date. Some people have jumped at the opportunity to update their profiles, while others have found the format to be confusing, overwhelming and miscommunicated.

“I’m not really using it,” says DGC’s Kendra Peavy. “Every now and then I take a peek, but I think more time needs to pass.”

DGC’s Erin Donahue feels similarly: “I still have no idea what Facebook Timeline really is. I don’t think it was communicated to users properly. Now one person’s page looks different from the next. I like that Facebook is evolving to meet the needs of consumers, but I wish it was easier to comprehend, and I wish there was some sort of guide for how Timeline works.”

Facebook’s mission is “to give people the power to share and make the world more open and connected.” From the beginning, it has achieved this through constant growth, innovation and adaptability. In the grand scheme of things, Timeline is just one of many changes experienced by the Facebook community over the past eight years. So will people get used to these changes as they have in the past? Share your thoughts on Facebook Timeline for brands and people in the comments section below.

All agog for Little Monsters?

https://i0.wp.com/images.wikia.com/ladygaga/images/e/e7/MonsterClaw.pngAnnouncing the launch of a new social network in the days following Facebook’s intention to go public, is like publicizing attendance to a non-NFL football game in the days following the Super Bowl.

Why should anyone care? As marketing communications professionals know too well, that depends on content + context.  If the non-NFL “event” was a pickup game that included Eli Manning and Tom Brady, it would get some significant buzz and interest, but even as an annual event, would hardly be any threat to the advertising and pop-culture bonanza known as the Super Bowl.

That’s the prism through which we are looking at this week’s news of Lady Gaga’s impending launch of a social network, Little Monsters,  built around her fan base and predicted to resemble the new social media “it girl” that is Pinterest.

True, Lady Gaga has logged some impressive online milestones: 19 million Twitter followers and the first performer to reach 1 billion YouTube views of her videos. But 19 million is a far cry from 850 million and counting. With this in mind, we look forward to seeing how Gaga’s people will make this initiative come to life and continue to keep it fresh for her Little Monsters.

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