Blog Archives

AWXI: Authentic Storytelling with Data

Day one at Advertising Week saw a consistent theme from the advertisers that descended upon New York City. The kickoff keynote panel was moderated by WPP’s Sir Martin Sorrell with executives from Live Nation, Amazon CBS, and ESPN to talk about data, storytelling, distribution and more.

“Consumers don’t think about branded content, they ask if it changed the experience for them,” said Russell Wallach, President of Live Nation’s Media & Sponsorship division. “They feel good about brands that enhance experiences for them.”

Mr. Sorrell pushed the panelists to discuss how they work with data and agencies. Most everyone on the panel agreed that first party data was their primary resource for talking to marketers, but agencies had an unusual role in the middle.

“We see that our agencies tell different things, so it can be hard for us to understand exactly what is going on. Some of our longest partnerships, the ones that have gone on for years, have been direct with the brand’s marketing team,” said Wallach.

A panel later in the day hosted by DDB focused on how to build an influential brand, and the panel continued the morning’s session with a focus on data.

“We’ve almost become data poets,” said Nancy Hill, CEO of the 4A’s. “We take the data that we want and use it to tell stories to our audiences.”

“Brands need to understand the influence they can bring and make a long-term commitment,” said Jeremy Levine, SVP of Digital Sales at Live Nation. “To market with music, they need to be in for the long haul, not a one-off event. We have the data to help that partnership”

Much credit was given to Omnicom agency sparks & honey for hosting daily “culture briefs” that look at the pulse of the conversation by consumers, with an eye towards social media trends.

“You have to have a fluid strategy with an ear to the ground, because things change so rapidly and you need to be ready,” said DDB President Mark O’Brien.

Several hiccups from brand’s real time social campaigns were discussed and the agreement was that global brands want to have an influence everywhere, but they must feel authentic.

“Global brand, local touch,” said Hill.

Financial Times Future of Marketing – Millennials, Music, and Data

Russell Wallach, President of Media and Sponsorship at Live Nation, spoke on how the world’s largest live-entertainment company uses data to reach consumers at the second annual Financial Times Future of Marketing Conference on Sept. 17, which brought together executives across a variety of industries.

“The journey of the fan experience, from ticket purchase to the end of the show months later, can be improved by data, and fans welcome anything they can to enhance those moments,” said Wallach.

And what is the future of marketing? The answer is Millennials, known as the most “social” generation ever because of their global, digital connectedness. Many agreed that music is at the intersection of marketing to this group.

“We have first party data from our over 200million-plus user database,” said Wallach. “So that presents a great opportunity for our brand and agency partners to develop unique properties.”

Wallach listed examples that included a recent investment in electronic dance music (EDM) by 7Up to target millennials and Hispanics and working with Kellogg’s to create a summer concert series targeted towards tweens.

To close out the day, Bruce Flohr, co-founder of GreenLight Media & Marketing, sat down with Marc Roberge, lead singer of O.A.R. to talk about how they market themselves to brands. “Music is worthless, yet everyone loves music,” said Flohr. “Everyone walks around with earbuds on, you can’t escape it, but the music has no tangible value.”

“The U2 deal with Apple really put the nail in the coffin for selling albums and completely devalues music,” said Roberge. “We now look for brands who want to partner with us. We want to understand why a brand chose us, and make sure it fits for everyone involved.”

Everyone agreed that the future for marketing is bright but cluttered as brands try to navigate every channel to reach their audience.

Music Helps Marketers Win Brand Fans

One of the recurring conversations during Advertising Week was the role music plays in marketing programs. Utilizing music in marketing initiatives has helped launch artists’ careers, provided once-in-a lifetime experiences to fans, launched entire festivals sponsored by brands, and more.

That was the focus on a star-studded panel of brand marketers at the “Live for the Applause” panel, sponsored by Live Nation. Moderated by Fast Company’s Tyler Gray, the panel included Paul Chibe, VP Marketing, Anheuser-Busch, Jennifer Breithaupt, SVP Entertainment Marketing, Citi, Chris Holdren, SVP of SPG & Global Web from Starwood Hotels and Resorts, and Russell Wallach, President, Live Nation Media & Sponsorship.

Each of those companies market their brands through music. Anheuser-Busch collaborates with Jay Z to create the Made in America Festival, a successful two-day concert covering a range of genres and artists. Citi works with their rewards program to allow fans unique access to concerts, and also utilizes artists like Katy Perry in special events. Starwood rewards their SPG members with intimate concerts held in their hotels as part of their “Hear the Music, See the World” initiative, where members travel around the world to meet and watch their favorite artists perform.

Below, hear from Paul Chibe, Jennifer Breithaupt, and Russell Wallach on the importance of music in their marketing decisions and connecting with passionate fans.

Live Nation’s Russell Wallach on Mobile and Innovation

A lot has been written about the challenges and complexity of designing great content for the smaller screens of mobile devices. But it can be done, and if mobile is going to earn brand marketing investment, it MUST be done. Last week at ad:tech, Live Nation Network’s President, Russell Wallach, delivered a keynote speech on the opportunities for brands to interact with music fans via the mobile device, before, during and after the show.

Below is an interview Russell did right after his speech with mobiThinking discussing the innovative ways brands are tapping Live Nation to reach their desired customers via the excitement of music and the intersection of technology.

%d bloggers like this: