Blog Archives

PJs and Work: How Webcasting Helps Us Work Outside The Office

talkpoint_infographic_crop2The nature of business today is online and always plugged in and Marissa Mayer’s new ruling for her Yahoo employees has put working remotely up for public discussion.

PR professionals have to expect the unexpected, and it’s extremely important to be connected and have fully functional communications tools at all times. Travel is also an essential part of our jobs so regardless of our physical location, face-time with clients and reporters is crucial.

DGC have been working with global technology company, TalkPoint, for some time, and we are well-versed in their SaaS cloud-based webcasting tool, Convey.

In a recent survey TalkPoint conducted, webcasting was said to greatly increase business efficiency. Here are some takeaways for consideration:

  • Scalability:  Webcasting enhances business communication by enabling distribution to larger audiences (38.8 % of respondents said  this is the primary reason for hosting a webcast)
  • Minimizing costs:  Webcasting reduces the need for travel which in turn reduces budgets (in some cases by more than 30%)
  • Increased turnout: Hosting events via webcast can increase turnout (69.9% of survey participants would rather use a webcast than attend an in-person meeting)
  • Convenience: Offering mobile webcasts enables attendance from any location (62.1% of people would rather give up coffee than their mobile device!)

TalkPoint doesn’t just create easy-to-use technology and make your CFO happy, it also turns data into a mean infographic. Check it out!

talkpoint_infographic

Can Lance Armstrong ‘EmergeStrong?’

Lance Armstrong’s confession, though not in the least bit surprising, was one of the hottest news topics this week. In addition to how this affects him as an athlete and a celebrity, it also opened a can of worms as to how this affects his brand, his image, his reputation and perhaps most importantly, his foundation, Livestrong.

Though it may not seem like an obvious business story, Nick Balletta, CEO of TalkPoint, took a look at the situation from a business perspective and weighed in for a CNBC.com blog post. This is a great example of hijacking current events and pairing them with executive’s passion points. Nick is an athlete as well as a businessman, and he had a very strong point of view on the Lance-debacle, as you can read below. Do you think Lance will “Emerge-strong?”

Balletta: After All the Lies Can Lance Armstrong ‘EmergeStrong?’

CNBC.com | Friday, 18 Jan 2013

It wasn’t spousal abuse. It wasn’t animal abuse, it wasn’t murder. It certainly wasn’t child abuse or a subsequent child abuse cover up. Sound familiar? Unfortunately, they all sound familiar and are all too common when it comes to American celebrities, and in particular, professional athletes.

It was a lie, and for that, Lance Armstrong must pay and pay dearly he will. His titles, his awards, his medals and his legacy, are at best damaged, but in reality, mostly gone. Not even the secular confessional of Oprah can bring them back. Lance is done.

That’s Lance the athlete, but what about Lance the humanitarian and philanthropist? The cancer survivor and founder of Livestrong?

If you speak with anyone whose family member was treated for cancer at the University of Pennsylvania or the parent of a child who was treated at Cook’s Medical Center, you will definitely get a different perspective. How about the children whose parents fought cancer and they received counseling from Wonders and Worries or all of the Katrina survivors that received financial aid? How about the thousands of families over the last 15 years that have benefited from the support of Livestrong? They don’t care about the “lie,” they are living the truth.

In business terms, it’s time for “Philanthropist Lance” to go through a restructure. A Chapter 11 restructure is not the end for a company; it is a new beginning. It only works, however, if underlying assets have true value.

Conversely, the media pundits will tell you that “Athlete Lance” is finished. For “Athlete Lance,” they will say it’s not restructure time, but liquidation time; a Chapter 7 in business terms. In Chapter 7, you shut it down, unwind it, sell off the assets, go into the abyss and quietly into the night.

The parents, the survivors, the fighters, the families and the medical professionals don’t care about “Athlete Lance.” They believe in “Philanthropist Lance” and the value of the underlying assets. They are living proof of the good he has done and the value he has brought and can continue to bring. They will help him restructure. The brand may be damaged now, but that does not mean it can’t be salvaged or saved. Remember Chrysler, Macy’s and most of the airlines? Some of the largest brands in the world have been through the restructure process. These companies shed the baggage, recapitalized, kept the good assets and went on to fight another day. It’s time for Lance to regroup with the people that will reinvest and support him so he can emerge from the bankruptcy.

I have completed a few triathlons (although I don’t consider myself a triathlete) and can really appreciate the achievements of “Athlete Lance.” PEDs notwithstanding, anyone who competes in the Tour de France is in many ways superhuman.

More people have been touched by cancer than cycle or complete triathlons. Anyone who battles cancer or supports one who does needs to put out an effort that is herculean. There are exponentially more people who understand that. None of them know what it takes to ride a bike up a mountain, nor do they care. Lance needs to focus his efforts on that constituency and get them to reinvest in his “restructure.”

Emergestrong!

Apology accepted, Lance. Now let’s get back to the real work.

Nick Balletta is CEO of TalkPoint, an industry leader in global communications technology.

© 2013 CNBC.com

 

…How to Prevent Social Media Bashtags

With social media offering a constant flow of highs and lows for brands, we couldn’t help but want to share TalkPoint CEO Nick Balletta’s commentary regarding McDonald’s recent Twitter debacle. Featured on CNBC, he shows that while there is no right and wrong approach to social media activation, there are certainly a few steps brands can take to try to avoid the missteps we so often read about.

Click here to take a look and weigh in.

On the Go: TalkPoint’s Mobile Webcasts Soar

TalkPoint webcast tech mobile DGC DiGennaro CommunicationsThere’s no denying that 2011 was a wild year for mobile technology, and if this year’s CES is any indication it looks like we are in for even more advancements in the space in 2012. As tablets and smartphones become faster, lighter, and incredibly intuitive, our ability to stay connected in this always-on world of ours becomes increasingly reliant on mobile technology.

This rings true for our business-related digital communications. For proof, just ask TalkPoint, the leader in global communications technology. When their clients came to them looking for the ability to take their webcasts on the go, TalkPoint advanced their software to run seamlessly on mobile devices. To say that this technology has been widely adopted would be an understatement–just last week TalkPoint announced that mobile viewership of TalkPoint-produced webcasts increased a whopping 74 percent between Q1 and Q4 of 2011, with 33 percent of all mobile views taking place during the busy summer months of June and July.

If you’re ready to take your webcasts on the go, you can check out more about TalkPoint’s mobile solutions here. In the meantime, we asked Nick Balletta, TalkPoint’s CEO, to share his best practices for mobile webcasting. Here’s what he suggests:

  • Create mobile-friendly content – Consider the mobile device screen size when developing webcast content. Mobile viewers may only be watching the video or have trouble viewing details.
  • Simplify registration – Mobile registrants are typing on a small keyboard, so limiting the data that needs to be entered to join an online event will make it faster and easier for viewers.
  • Master social media –The use of interactive social media “sharing” buttons are particularly effective for promoting mobile webcasts, but too many active social media elements can lead to multitasking by the viewer.
  • Don’t forget about post-event viewing – Provide mobile webcasting viewers with a link to watch/review the webcast at a later date, providing webcast attendees with another opportunity to access the material from the event.

To hear more straight from Nick, check him out in The Point:

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