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And That’s A Wrap!

social media team

Another Advertising Week has come and gone!  This year proved to be just as eventful as years’ past.  Our team on the ground seemed to have do and see it all (although we know that would be impossible…)

We wanted to summarize a few of our top highlights, but be sure to check out the rest of our social channels to see all of what we were up to throughout the week (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter)

The UCB Comedy: Seriously Funny session was hosted by none other than the Upright Citizens Brigade comedy theater. For those not as familiar with the New York comedy scene UCB is one of the most notable and prestigious theaters in the city (and country) and was the starting place for many famous actors in the industry, not to mention launched by Goddess Amy Poehler. This session was run by UCB Director/Producers Nathan Russell and Julie Gomez and covered the business side of the theater. Some may be surprised to learn that in addition to their hilariously innovative shows the organization also works with both brands and marketing/advertising agencies to create unique branded content that breaks through the clutter by way of comedy. Some takeaways? Collaboration is key, and when pressured about ROI metrics make the brand/product seem as approachable as possible. — Emily Donoho, Junior Designer

I attended a few sessions over the week, but there were two that really stuck out to me. On Thursday, I attended the ‘From Minibar to Megahit’ panel, where Partners + Napier’s CEO and Associate Director, Marketing & Business Development were on stage with the Co-Founders and leading lady entrepreneurs of on-demand, alcohol delivery service, Minibar. The four ladies led a compelling conversation, on what the road to success looked like for Lara Crystal and Lindsey Andrews, as they took on the challenge of opening their business. One of my favorite moments of the session, were when the ladies admitted that the challenge of opening an app in the alcohol space is often intimidating to business people, but Lara and Lindsey saw it as intriguing and took the industry by storm. Check out their app and get your drinks for tonight 😉 — Peyton McCarthy, Account Executive

At Project: WorldWide’s “Stories of Creative Invention” the audience was exposed to a wide breadth of innovation from engineering blocking with Little Bits’ founder, Ayah Bdeir to street art with Bradley Theodore to fitness-like business clothing with Aman Advani.  It became abundantly clear that creative invention is around us more than we might have originally imagined.  Each speaker radiated inspiration; each story just as captivating as the last.  Advertising Week is programmed with many sessions that discuss the future of advertising, the problem with ad-blocking, the new creative talent, and so on and so forth.  That said, to attend a session that put pure creativity and inventive spirit on the stage was a breath of fresh air to say the least.  Leaving the session you couldn’t help but think, “What am I doing wrong with my life?” — Jackie Berte, Senior Account Executive

The political season was alive and well at Advertising Week. During the panel on how technology is shaping political advertising, panelists explained that too often, we frame how we see politics through the lens of the presidential campaigns themselves which includes advertising. It’s all about the messaging during these campaigns and the media serves as the most popular delivery mechanism. Speaking of media, Facebook is making a name for themselves on the media side with 61% of millennials consuming their political news on the platform. “The Donald” was a hot topic. Thoughts from the panelists across the board? When we call Trump a master of social, we’re doing a disservice to those who are doing it right and that we “confuse noise with signal.” And who is doing it right? All panelists agreed that Ben Carson has a strong presence across the board on social platforms. But what is king during ads in this election season? Creative. The quality of creative is key to delivering the message that will ultimately win voters over. — Ali Colangelo, Account Director

My other favorite panel of the week was the ‘Creative & Technology: Lorraine Twohill & David Droga in Conversation’ on Wednesday. From the Google side, it was super interesting to hear from Lorraine, the tech company’s SVP of Global Marketing on the brand’s recent logo change, especially since she was a leading force behind the change. The audience learned a few fun facts about the change, like the ‘e’ is tilted, simply because the guy behind Google’s doodles every day, asked for it to look like it was smiling. The conversation was also centered around Droga5’s relationship with Google as a client, and the work that the agency has done of late, including the adorable ‘Friends Furever’ spot which came out earlier this year and took a different and more loving approach for a tech company ad. David also discussed some of the agency’s other famed work, like the Under Armour spots with Misty Copeland, where he dug deep on the ways that Droga5 thinks about advertising and looking beyond just content itself, but looking to when and where consumers will be consuming the content before creating an ad. As a lady who was inspired by the spots, learning more about the creative strategy was a huge takeaway for me. — Peyton McCarthy, Account Executive

Our team was both inspired and awed at Sheryl Sandberg’s poise, knowledge and overall demeanor during her fireside chat with Bloomberg’s chief content officer, Josh Tyrangiel. Sheryl’s session touched on a variety topics, including the risks people take in business, why Facebook is the place to be for television advertisers, feedback within the work place, leadership and talent. In a moving moment towards the end of the session, Sheryl discussed how expressing herself on Facebook helped her in the days and weeks after her husband’s death, stating “when we know and understand each other, the world becomes smaller and more peaceful.”  She cracked jokes, rattled off impressive facts around mobile and advertising, and discussed navigating Facebook’s role in the rest of the world, including India and China.  The session was an-hour long, but it was packed with information and inspiration.  Our team sat in awe as we watched Sheryl, and left ready to tackle our own jobs with the same fire that Sheryl tackles hers.  — Lexi Hewitt, Account Executive

We’ll soon be preparing for next year, but until then…adios!

DGC’s Picks from Day 1

After Day 1 of Advertising Week, DGC pulled together our top picks from the first sessions of the week.  Check back here each morning for some of our favorite content from the day before.

At the “Breaking Down Social and Mobile” Mobile Media Summit session with Bob Hall (SVP of RadiumOne) and Shenen Reed (President, Digital, MEC North America), both offered unique insights. Shenan shared that positive brand association, rather than number of shares, is a strong indicator of campaign success. Bob spoke about how 72% of sharing happens on a desktop, but 54% of viewing is happening on mobile. — Scott Berwitz, VP

During the “Impossible to Ignore” panel with DDB New York’s CCO Icaro Doria, there was an insightful discussion around how advertisers and marketers should always stay on top of what’s current and culturally relevant to create content that’s ‘impossible to ignore’ by the audience. Icaro said, “When it comes to ad blocking, Apple just made bad advertising go away really fast so only good ads with a compelling message can stay.” — Sylvia Zhou, Senior Account Executive

“The Power of Sports: The How and Why of Fan Passion” took a look at the sports stories that often get overlooked in mainstream news coverage. Ryan Eckle, VP of Brand Marketing for Dick’s Sporting Goods talked about some of Dick’s original content and “building brand through cause.” — Ali Colangelo, Account Director

Deep breath in, deep breath out.  As odd as it seemed in the midst of the craziness of Advertising Week, that was how this reflective session started. In this session, MEC’s Global Chief Talent Officer, Marie-Claire Barker and panelists explored mindfulness in the workplace and how companies can use it to improve overall employee happiness and workplace culture. Panelists agreed that it’s not about the industries, but about the human beings in these industries, and that the people are what companies need to focus on if they truly want to be “mindful” in the work place. — Lexi Hewitt, Account Coordinator

At the Cross-Screen Summit: Why Does Context Matter? Because Context Matters! session with Hulu, ESPN, @radical.media, Olson and TubeMogul, there was a lot of discussion around how marketers now must produce multiple creative executions of a campaign around a unifying theme to better meet the needs of today’s multiplatform and multi-device audience. With the industry’s focus on using data for its targeting abilities, Hulu’s SVP Advertising Sales Peter Naylor remarked on the necessary components for ad effectiveness, saying, “Marketers have to have a healthy dose of data and context.” There was agreement among panelists that data needs to be used to inform creative, but that telling a relevant story for the target audience still has to be the primary foundation of any campaign. — Lauren Leff, VP

There was no shortage of amazing content on Day 1, but for me the main highlight was definitely Margaret Gould Stewart, Facebook’s Director of Product Design at IAB MIXX. Margaret discussed the importance of maintaining humility in design, and following “desire paths” to design not only for people, but with people as well. A great example she shared was the “Missed Call” product Facebook developed in India to meet the demand of how people throughout the country were calling each other and hanging up, to avoid being charged. Different numbers of missed calls mean different things, almost like a modern day Morse code. Facebook recognized this and incorporated it into their features, allowing people to connect more easily to the people who matter to them. — Megan Sweat, Senior Account Executive

One of the first sessions of the day was the unveiling of new research by Ogilvy & Mather. The session titled, “Do Brands Still Matter”? was posed to the audience before diving into the findings from the study. Colin Mitchell, Ogilvy & Mather’s Worldwide Head of Planning discussed the research findings which revealed that brands do still matter… just not like they used to. It’s an interesting topic they tackled that also engaged in further discussion with guest speakers, Jennifer Healan of Coca-Cola and Hope Cowan of Facebook — both very different, but extremely relevant brands in the lives of consumers today. Both Jennifer and Hope shared various examples of how and why their brands are successfully mattering to their targets today – from happiness to helping people stay connected – it was evident that they were hitting home on the top factors of mattering in the lives of today’s consumer. — Kelsey Merkel, Account Director

Enjoy Day 2 – it’s already off to a great start!

Advertising Week is Here Again…

It can be all too easy to lose sight of the big picture in our “have to,” ultra-packed, always-connected day-to-day workflow that has the power to both energize and tire out the average advertising executive.  Where is the industry going? What are the key issues that are re-shaping the business?

Enter Advertising Week, the industry’s once-a-year, week-long event that brings together the brightest minds from brands, agencies, tech companies, startups, etc. to take that much-needed step back and have the broader, high-level conversations that are as needed as they are rare. Next week kicks off the 12th Advertising Week, and it will no doubt continue to spark the exciting conversations and ideas that have made it the coveted tent pole industry event it has become.

As always, DGC will be on-site, supporting a vast array of clients at this year’s festivities and tweeting, Instagram-ing, Facebooking and Hit-Boarding (read: blogging) about the most exciting news and insights offered by this year’s incredible roster of speakers – which includes Sir Martin Sorrell, Gloria Estefan, Elizabeth Vargas and Ryan Seacrest, to name just a few.

Here are some of the sessions we will be attending:

  • Do Brands Still Matter — Monday, 10:00am at the Liberty Theater
  • Capitalizing on Mobile Video — Monday, 10:00am at Times Center Stage
  • Breaking Down Social and Mobile — Monday, 2:05pm at the Grand Hyatt New York
  • Connecting in a Mobile World: A Conversation with Sheryl Sandberg — Tuesday, 10:00am at Times Center Stage
  • Frito Lay: The Intersection of Marketing & Technology — Tuesday, 10:15am at Liberty Theater
  • People, Not Pages: What Does “Buying Audiences” Mean for Media and Marketers — Tuesday, 2:00pm at the Metropolitan Pavilion
  • Stories of Creative Invention — Tuesday, 3:00pm at B.B. King
  • Getting Away: Inside the Vacation Mentality — Wednesday, 3:00pm at B.B. King
  • Are We On Target?: Making The Most Of Mobile’s Unique Power — Thursday, 9:15am at the Metropolitan Pavilion
  • The Instagram Effect — Thursday, 10:00am at Times Center Stage
  • WIRED CMOs — Thursday, 12:00pm at the NASDAQ
  • Two Start-Ups, One Mission — Thursday, 4:30pm at Times Center Hall

Please find our take on the most compelling insights on news on the DGC Hit Board, as well as on our Facebook page, Twitter and Instagram feeds!

Super Bowl: A Game of HORSE and the Pre-Game Debate

Twenty years ago, as a young PR buck, I was tasked with creating a strategy to help McDonald’s leverage its Super Bowl XXVII “Nothing But Net” spot.  I knew we had PR gold in our hands when the storyboards included Michael Jordan and Larry Bird in a game of HORSE. Slam dunk!

What wasn’t a slam dunk at the time was my idea: invite select media on-set (Entertainment Tonight, ESPN, a few others) to capture interviews with Jordan, Bird, director Joe Pytka and behind-the-scenes footage for segments that would air BEFORE the game to build anticipation and consumer engagement.

The heated debates at the Golden Arches over a concept that seemed heretical at the time were unforgettable. But, we hit pay dirt that year with phenomenal pre-game PR and a USA Today Ad Meter victory. It arguably kick-started what today is considered the first page of the Super Bowl Commercial PR Playbook.  In fact, now NOT finding ways to gain exposure for a brand’s Super Bowl spot before the game is considered heretical.

Stuart Elliott did a deep dive on the subject in The New York Times this week that’s worth reading…

Are You Saving Trees?

Interesting news came out of the publishing world in recent weeks, with Hearst Magazines announcing a deal to begin selling three of its magazines – Esquire, Popular Science and O, the Oprah Magazine – for the iPad, using Apple’s subscription model. That came shortly after Time Inc.’s announcement about its Sports Illustrated, Time and Fortune titles, and was immediately followed by today’s news that Condé will soon offer iPad subscriptions to its Vanity Fair, Glamour, The New Yorker and others. Seems every major publisher is getting on board. The challenge, however, is how to get advertisers to do the same.

You’d think the ultra-targeting of ads that technologies like tablets offer, and the ultra-effective types of ad units publishers are developing for the digital realm, would help lock the deal. The challenge is how to count a digital subscriber relative to a print edition subscriber when it comes to determining ad rates. According to The New York Times, the Audit Bureau of Circulations has said that each digital subscription should count toward the rate base — the number of copies used to sell advertising. At the same time, publishers still demand a much higher premium for a print ad versus one that appears online.

It’s an interesting situation and one that I’ll leave to the advertising world to shake out. As a PR guy, there’s a similar issue to grapple with tied to earned media and its value, as dedicated online content delivered by publishers becomes more robust. Forbes’ CEO and CMO Networks, The New York Times’ Media Decoder, and Fast Company’s 30 Second MBA are just three of many highly influential online destinations we work with regularly to help showcase the vision and leadership of our C-suite clients. When a video interview posts to such a site, or breaking news hits there first, we can tell within minutes that the marketing influencers and brand decision makers we’re trying to reach are, in fact, paying attention to the message, sharing it with others, etc.

Despite the proven effectiveness of these types of placements as part of a broader thought leadership strategy, the fact is that many C-suiters ask that our efforts on their behalf focus almost exclusively on securing opportunities on the printed page. They believe their inclusion in a Fast Company printed edition story, for example, will carry a higher perceived value among prospects, clients, employees, investors and business partners than even deeper editorial coverage that would appear on FastCompany.com. We have a multitude of evidence that suggests otherwise, including their own admissions that they’re consuming most of their business reading online today. It doesn’t seem to sway them – yet.

What about you? Do you find yourself more engaged, persuaded, impressed, etc., by a story or mention that appears in print rather than – or in addition to – online? For me, the answer is a definite “no.” In fact, other than diving into that beautiful thing that is the Sunday New York Times every week, my life has become so “digital,” the impact of one distribution channel versus another has entirely faded away. I guess I’m saving a lot of trees. How about you?

Are You A Media Darling?

Every week, if not every day, clients inevitably tell us that their most coveted desire for media coverage is to be in Fast Company and The New York Times’ “Corner Office” column. We wholeheartedly agree! Yet there’s so much more to placing that proverbial “story” than meets the eye, so to speak.

To get into a top-tier publication like Fast Company, one must be, do, have or talk the innovative walk to meet the desires of the magazine’s readers for under-the-radar information not found elsewhere. The Times’ “Corner Office” and other executive columns of this type require compelling personalized accounts of successful career strategies or business lessons learned that the column’s readers can use to improve their own efforts.

Coming up with that unique point-of-view or learning oftentimes requires digging around in and re-packaging existing experience in a fresh and creative way that fits a reporter’s, producer’s or specific column’s format. What does this mean? While most CEOs and entrepreneurs have encountered the usual challenges (say, the need to develop a leadership style or an effective negotiation strategy), it’s the personal details and specific anecdotal examples that make a story resonate with the audience.

To that end, here are three tips for developing an inner Media Darling:

1. Think about the 5 Ws: Examine the who, what, when where, why (and How) of your existing experience, knowledge and business information. Assemble the facts and develop unique (dare we say provocative) anecdotes about challenges faced or reasons for innovation. Then compare it to what’s currently in the press. How does it sound? The same? Different?

2. Personality Please: Give your story character and always reveal personality through the use of lively and entertaining language in your own voice. It gives your story credibility, depth and sincerity. Whether writing an article or giving a telephone interview, this is critical to giving your story life.

3. Deliver the Goods: The client in this situation is the media outlet and its audience – the readers or viewers. Sell the story, not the company. Breakthrough takeaways are necessary to score the premium real estate.

Marketing Opportunities for a Changing Population

In “A Growing Population, and Target, for Marketers,” advertising reporter Stuart Elliott of The New York Times touches on a critical topic facing today’s marketers – Spanish-speaking consumers. His piece not only highlights the latest L’Oreal USA campaign targeting this important audience, but also shares vital stats regarding the growth of this demographic.

According to the 2010 census released last week, the Hispanic population accounts for more than half of US growth in the last decade. In fact, 1 in 6 residents in the country are now Hispanic. Looking ahead 40 years, analysts speculate that the Hispanic population will represent 29 percent of the entire population. So as a brand or an agency helping companies expand, are you considering ways to reach this demographic? If not, it’s time to start.

Here at DGC we’re working with several multicultural agencies. These companies are dedicating their days (and probably some of their nights) to the pursuit of reaching ever-growing, minority markets – strategically and effectively. Like L’Oreal USA’s latest campaign – Club de Noveleras – they are using consumer insights and research, emerging channels and multiple touch points to provide content and create discussions around brands that are relevant to the lives of these important audiences.

Looking to learn more about reaching multicultural audiences? Check out these tools from the PRSA, Pew Hispanic Center and Engage:Hispanics.

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